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New Approaches to Intellectual Property, New York, 2005

June 13, 2005 - June 14, 2005
Columbia University   New York, New York, United States

Agenda  188kb pdf
Meeting Report  175kb pdf

There is increasing concern about the formulation of intellectual property regimes that best serve the public, especially in developing countries. Defenders of stronger intellectual property rights for industries such as pharmaceuticals and software, contend that all will benefit, yet many others believe stronger property rights will stifle efforts to bridge the technology gap or fight infectious disease in developing countries.

Recognizing that these issues are of vital concern to the entire world, the TransAtlantic Consumer Dialogue and the Initiative for Policy Dialogue jointly held a two-day meeting on June 13 and 14, 2005, at Columbia University to marshal historical, theoretical, and political analysis on these matters.

Partners

There is increasing concern about the formulation of intellectual property regimes that best serve the public, including those implemented in developing countries. The issue was placed firmly on the agenda at the General Assembly Meeting of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in Geneva the past fall under the initiative of Argentina, Brazil and many other developing countries. The call was renewed at the Seoul ministerial meeting of the least developed countries the following month, and has now been reinforced by a recent paper from a group of 14 developing countries (the Friends of Development), calling for a global framework that promotes development and 'access to knowledge for all.'

Concerns about access to knowledge and life saving drugs and enhanced disparities between the developed and developing countries lie behind these calls. Yet defenders of existing movements towards stronger intellectual property rights contend that all will benefit. The issue is of vital concern to the entire world, and it is important to marshal what history, theory, evidence, and solid policy analysis as opposed to special interest posturing has to say.

To consider these matters, the TransAtlantic Consumer Dialogue, which has a secretariat in London and the Initiative for Policy Dialogue jointly held a two-day meeting on June 13 and 14, 2005, at Columbia University.